Simple Isn’t Easy – changing the way the NHS communicates with patients

This is a fantastic blog from David Gilbert – has made me very aware of how much better my own practice’s communications should be. I’ll post our new letters and guides to how we can make better use of GP appointments next.
It’s worth noting that I have a lot of nonsensical letters from private companies, e.g. about insurance, so I don’t think healthcare is uniquely bad at this!

Future Patient - musings on patient-led healthcare

All the letters I get from businesses are clear, concise and useful. I just got a letter confirming a hotel booking. It was all these things. I feel confident that when I arrive I will be welcomed and cared for. The letter told me implicitly and explicitly that I was important.

For patients, the communications they receive are practically and symbolically important. An appointment letter may be the first time they come into contact with the health service. Unlike hotel customers, they may need reassurance. Being in pain, vulnerable and uncertain, the NHS must send a letter that is extra careful with content, structure and language.

I recently got an almost incomprehensible hospital appointment letter that barked: ‘make sure you attend’ in bold letters surrounded by a red-outlined box. There was no map, no mention of how to prepare (was I going to have to undress? What sort of questions…

View original post 1,040 more words

3 responses to “Simple Isn’t Easy – changing the way the NHS communicates with patients

  1. Dear Jonathon,
    I wondered if you might be interested in this – http://www.wherearewenow2016.wordpress.com

    Trying to put some thoughts together around aesthetics and care.

    Kind Regards

    Ian Rastrick

  2. Thanks Jonathon,
    I’ve just added a link to your BMJ article – “Lessons from the other side” – on the latest post – “Before the First Note”
    Kind Regards
    Ian

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s